Trees of Transition

Planting seeds of hope throughout our world through sharing photography and thoughts on teaching, cooking, and life transitions.


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Our Little Blondie Has Arrived!

Joel was born yesterday the 14th of November at 2:20am!!! He is a blondie, weighed 9 lb 8 oz at birth and is 23” long. He has Stephen’s forehead and my chin. 👶

We labored at home from Sunday morning until Monday afternoon so that we were 7cm dilated when we checked into the hospital on Monday; after 10 hours of hospital labor, we got to see our baby boy, Joel Christopher Schuh. Then we got to celebrate him the rest of his birthday day!!

I love being a mama!! Joel is a good eater and sleeping pretty well for a newborn; we are so thankful for this gift!

-Mary Hope

.<<<
ry Hope

Copyright 2017

P.S. Thank you for stopping by! I insert affiliate links, such as  Amazon, into my posts to share interesting books and products. If you buy something or start a registry, I receive income, for which I am thankful. So…< em>– shop on  Amazon< em>–shop at my Etsy photo card/notecard/art shop: Trees of Transition Art & Design< em>–keep on reading this blog.< em>Thank you again, and peace to you and your family!< em>~Mary Hope< img src=”https://treesoftransition.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/img_5051.jpg&#8221; height=”4032″ class=”wp-image-3169″ width=”3024″>

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Ginger Fried Rice — Comfort Food for Mama

What’s more comforting than eggs and bacon? This recipe mixes those with Asian flavors that make you want to eat the whole pan. Mothers tend to be the ones that comfort, but after having a baby, they need to be comforted as well as they heal and adjust to caring for the new little life in their family. This recipe is based on one in the wonderful book, The First Forty Days  — The First Forty Days: The Essential Art of Nourishing the New Mother by Heng Ou; I added more vegetables.

2 Tblsp. coconut oil or sesame oil

5 green onions, sliced

¼ cup 1/16th cubed fresh ginger

3 cloves garlic, chopped

4 slices bacon, chopped into 1-inch lengths

2 cups chopped cabbage

1 ½ cups sliced mushrooms

2 eggs

3 cups cooked white or brown rice

Salt and pepper to taste

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To Buy or Not to Buy–Essential Items for a Baby Registry 


A friend (who loves simplicity and does not put up with clutter) gave me a list of essential items to have for taking care of a baby! 

I am 5-months pregnant, and I’m still figuring out what we need to get, so seeing this list is reassuring because it seems doable.

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Stop and Listen


Last night before we had a picnic with friends on the Biltmore Estate, they gave us a parenting tip that a wise nurse told them after their daughter was born:
“Listen to your child.”

This seems simple, but in our speedy culture, many people forget to do this; the child usually knows what he or she needs, and there will be much more peace  if we just stop and listen and help meet that need. 

I’m going to remember this to use with our Baby!

Have a peaceful evening.

-Mary Hope


Copyright 2017


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Learning Self-Concept

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The helpful book Teaching With Love and Logic by Jim Fay and David Funk has helped me understand myself and the students I work with greatly. Here are a few quotes:

“We respond to covert messages much more than we ever do to the overt” (Fay and Funk 126).

“The basic rule is: Unconditionally accept the worthy person, even while rejecting the questionable behavior” (Fay and Funk 129).

“Learning from consequences is a struggle that can cause pain, but surviving the struggle is a great self-concept builder. We learn that we are capable” (Fay and Funk 131).

How these authors mix stories with action steps on how to relate to students and manage people better makes me feel I can do this. Whether you are a teacher or parent or work with children somewhere, it is a helpful book.

It took me over a year to read this book through because it was helpful to read a bit, put it into practice, think about it for a time, and then get back to it. Now that I’ve finished it, I get to loan it to friends who have seen me reading it, but I’m so thankful for the self-awareness it taught me.

Check it out!

By M. H. Campbell

Copyright 2015


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Fighter Pilot Dream Gets Queasy…

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Homeschooling’s Black, White, & Gray Series 1 Episode 9

The career guidance test question asked, “Would you like to be a fighter pilot?” My choices: Yes or No. I thought, “I would like to be a fighter pilot once at least…but I don’t want to kill anyone…” So I marked, “Yes.” This might have messed up the results of the career test a little bit, but it felt empowering to mark, “Yes!”

When I received the results back, they were helpful in thinking about my future. I still mainly wanted to be a wife and a mother, but it gave me more self-awareness. In traditional schools, you take aptitude tests to help you figure out your career, but in homeschool, it’s up to the parents or the students to go after taking these tests. It’s a good idea to take at least one career aptitude test.

My parents helped me sign up and take those tests. They didn’t make all of us kids take them, but if we showed interested, then we could. I took the Career Direct test (and it is still around: http://www.careerdirectonline.org/). My parents and I still laugh about my wanting to be a fighter pilot.

What did I want from being a fighter pilot? Adventure, seeing new sights, and speeding through the heavens comes to mind.

Last weekend I got a little taste of being just a regular pilot, and it was different than I thought…
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Through High School or to Traditional High School? That is a Homeschooling Gray Question

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Homeschooling’s Black, White, and Gray Series 1 Episode 5

Pushing through streams of United States high school students is a cultural experience. In a private school it looks like masses of dark blue uniformed students, arms full of books, trying to get to class on time. The girls are in pleated skirts, trying to get away with having them as short as possible, batting their eyes at the boys as they pass. The boys are trying to keep their football gear on top of the locker, and random students are trying to get their backpack out from behind the lockers. Voices, elbows, and weaving through the people to get to class on time makes up those four minute passing periods. The important social issues (catch up with friends or smile at that cute boy) at school tend to happen then or at lunch. The classes teach students more of the traditional subjects they need to know for life (or at least that is a goal; it’s up to the students if they get it). Does a child need to have this traditional “secondary school” experience to be able to function well in their society?

Of course, one can say the answer is “No,” because a child can learn how society functions through other experiences such as dance classes, sports teams, church groups, and other structured clubs.

The answer may be more gray than that: It depends on the child and what he or she needs in regards to learning styles and in regards to career goals.

Some children do best when surrounded with many other students. They lead the way in making up plays and group games when they are young, and become the student leaders in high school. Extroverted students do better (socially at least) when learning with other students around. If your high school student is more extroverted, considering placing them in a traditional school setting for high school could make them come alive! The people connections and the opportunities to work together will develop them and expand their world in a productive way.

On the other hand, if you have an introverted student on your hands, homeschool high school without a co-op or attending classes at a community college will be a self-paced, self-taught type of education, (depending on the curriculum and the parent’s familiarity with the subject.) Introverts can do better at home, but getting challenged to work in groups is a helpful life experience.
I had an introverted homeschool high school experience, and yes, I have some gaps from areas I wasn’t as interested in, so I didn’t push myself into them deeper, but the education was adequate. If I had known I wanted to be a high school English teacher early in high school, going to public school could have been helpful education.

The decision about going to a traditional high school should be made together with the student because for some careers, traditional high school would be a helpful training ground for going into that field. For example, I have been in the field of education the last five years. I have had some gaps in my knowledge of traditional schools and how students act that I would just know if I had attended traditional school, and knowing the social cues better would have been helpful to have. I’ve learned to fill in those gaps, but it has taken time and more energy than if I had just learned it by growing up through traditional school. (For example: How students are just at their worst for substitute teachers! And I don’t get this idea of trying to get by with the least amount of work possible. Don’t you want to learn?!?) If your homeschool student wants to go into a science field, it might be a good idea to look for a high school that has a more intense science focus or invest in laboratory instruments at your homeschool.

Encourage your student to explore different fields of interest and pick one that she or he loves, and then pick the education method that will help your child succeed the most in that field.

The answer to doing homeschool high school or not is a gray one that homeschool parents will have to think through and decide with their child’s best interest in mind.

By M. H. Campbell Copyright 2014